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Others have said it, now I'm going to rant on the topic too. Since… - Nite Mirror [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Nite Mirror

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[Dec. 8th, 2008|01:38 pm]
Nite Mirror
Others have said it, now I'm going to rant on the topic too.

Since the Veterans Committee for the Baseball Hall of Fame has been set up, no one from the modern age has been elected into the Hall by them.

If the likes of Ron Santo, Gil Hodges, and Joe Torre, three baseball greats that should have been in the HOF a long time ago can't get in. The system is a joke.

While I know I have no credentials other than being a fan of a certain Chicago baseball team, I'm half-way tempted to start my own little ... well, Hall of Fame is taken, but create some sort of public list of modern age baseball greats that deserve recognition if the Veterans Committe won't.

The three mentioned above would be on the top of that list.

Heck, I don't know if I'll keep it up, but I do hereby declare that Nitemirror's modern age baseball greats list start with those three.

Ron Santo - third baseman for the Chicago Cubs in the 1960's and early 1970's. Nine time all-star, 5 consecutive golden gloves, 342 career homeruns, 1,331 RBIs. 12 seasons with 20 or more doubles. Played his entire career with type 1 diabetes and has told the story of how he even hit a grand slam while having an insulin reaction and seeing 3 pitchers and 3 balls heading toward him ("I just swung at the ball in the middle," he's quoted as saying).

Gil Hodges - first baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers during the late 1940's and 1950's. 11 consecutive seasons with 20 or more homeruns, 14 career grand slams (at one time the record for the National League), Eight time all-star, 3 gold gloves, a career .273 batting average, 371 homeruns, and 1,273 RBIs.

Joe Torre - Played catcher, third base, and first base during his 18 year career. .297 career batting average, 344 doubles, 252 homeruns, 1,185 RBIs. a gold glove winner, Nine time all-star, 1971 NL-MVP.
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