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Listening to podcasts for me is usually background noise. However,… - Nite Mirror [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Nite Mirror

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[Apr. 9th, 2010|03:42 pm]
Nite Mirror
Listening to podcasts for me is usually background noise. However, in the past week, there were two things I heard in two different podcasts that stuck in my head as being worth remembering.

First, I was listening to ... um, well, the exact podcast isn't important. It isn't a podcast dedicated to poker, but one of the hosts of it is a professional poker player. They were talking about a guy they were helping who is down on his luck, and how he basically is believing he is a loser in life because of bad luck life keeps throwing his way.

In talking about this gentleman, this poker playing host brought up the poker concept of a bad beat which is basically where you do everything right and still lose the hand. He also said he considers that as a professional poker player it's his job to take bad beats. He's happy for the other guy to occasionally get lucky against him so that guy will keep playing against him even though the other guy isn't as good a player.

Anyway, he was making the point that the man they were talking about in this podcast was moaning about how unfair life was to him and seemed to want them (the hosts of this podcast) to agree he was an unlucky guy who life was showering in ... um, toro poo-poo, and there's nothing for him to do but give up because nothing would work for him anyway.

Life is unfair. It gives out bad beats where we can do everything correctly and still have some tragedy happen in our lives. Just as that podcast host was saying it's his job as a professional poker player to take bad beats in poker; it's everyone's job to take bad beats in life. It was a metaphor I could really understand on more than one level.

The other thing that caught my ear was in Robert Llewellyn's carpool podcast. Robert was interviewing Neil Mullarkey who teaches business people improv comedy. Mr. Mullarkey was saying for successful improvisation you take what's given to you and build on it. You don't throw a "blocker" (a comedy term that means going for a cheap joke that you won't be able to build on further in the comedy routine).

Mr. Mullarkey continued saying that what he teaches business people about improv is also his philosophy on life: you go with the flow; listen to the setup others are giving you; build on what you're given; and don't try to block it by imposing ideas you want to use that don't fit -- Sounds like a good philosophy to me.

Well, that's my thoughts for today and writing this has made me rather late. So time to get moving.
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